Building a Personal Brand as a Tech Leader

Building your Personal Brand as a tech Leader
Transcript

Hessie Jones

So these days there has been this surge of people who are developing influence within their specific corner of the market. These are the digital craters who specialize in a niche, and they begin to establish themselves as big experts in their field. There’s this rise of influence that these days has been less about celebrity, but now it’s also a strategic advantage for many entrepreneurs who want to build relation. Ships, but ultimately leverage their personal brand to build their business. Welcome to tech uncensored. Hi everyone. My name is Hessie Jones and here’s the scenario you’re building your business, you’re building your product, you’re getting some critical feedback, and now you’re you’re starting to get some traction, but you want to move faster. You want to start finding more customers? Get ready for potential investment, but you’re a small team and you have a very limited social media presence. So, but one thing you’re really good at is understanding. Let’s say the real estate industry, you’re a form of broker, and now you realize this sector needs major disruption. So, you’re passionate about solving this problem, but for the sake of your growth, you realize that to make a real impact, you need to establish yourself. As a thought leader within the real estate space, so how do you do it? Many startups don’t realize the value of establishing their own personal brands. With the rise of social media, there’s been this that there’s been a closing of this gap between. Between promotion and community and now there are endless opportunities to establish yourself as a tech leader that can help your company and yourself grow. So today I’m happy to speak to two founders who are doing just that and. Stephanie Clip, who is a Co founder and CEO of MyCo Futures North Atlantic and Staci LaToison, who is a founding partner of Dream Big Ventures. We’ll actually talk to them about what they’re doing, how they did it, understand the importance of authenticity, which is really, I guess. Important when it comes to defining your. Presence in social. Media and they’ll provide advice on how early stage founders can actually develop opportunities by building their personal brands and establishing themselves as tech leaders. So thank you, Stephanie and Stacy, for coming and talking to me about this today.

 

Stephanie Lipp

Thanks so much for having us. It’s always lovely to chat with you.

Hessie Jones

Absolutely. OK. So let’s start. Let’s start with Stephanie, because it’s probably easier to figure out how you got started by telling us a little bit about yourself and your company.

 

Stephanie Lipp

Sure. Yes. Stephanie Lipp, the CEO of MyCo Futures, I actually began my began my career in art and photography. I love fashion industry So I was a fashion photographer and worked with other brands. On their digital marketing, their branding and I really, really loved helping create a brand and doing visual communication because I think no matter how big your company is, the way you present yourself to the world is really valuable. But then I took a detour from the arts to manage nonprofit housing and that gave me a whole other lot of lessons about building a business and working with people. But it was really when my co-founder partner and I moved to Newfoundland to start a gourmet mushroom farm, which then pivoted into a startup, creating a next Gen. material made from my ceiling, which is the root system of fungi that we cultivate in vertical farm. That I really came back around to my roots in branding communications and I saw how useful that was to building my presence online. And then after the pandemic out in the real world.

 

Hessie Jones

So this came easy to you. It seems like is that that was.

 

Stephanie Lipp

That was the case.

 

Hessie Jones

Background. OK, Stacy, I’m going to turn to you. Tell us a little bit about yourself. You just seem to do so many things and obviously your presence has evolved online over time, so. Who are you and what do you do?

 

Staci LaToison

Oh, I have a lot of energy, so I I’m involved in several things that I’m really passionate about. I’m an award-winning investor, best selling author. I’m a consultant. I’m a podcast host of Her Money Moves podcast where I interview women. CEOs and influential business leaders who are making an impact on our economy and in our communities and I. Just all-aroundlove empowering women. I worked for Chevron for 22 years around the globe, managing billion dollar budgets and global teams. I was in China for five years. I was in Angola, Africa next that day or two and got to the point where it kind of during the pandemic. I decided that I’m going to put my fate in my own hands and decided that I was going to go out on my own and I’ve always had an entrepreneurial spirit. So it was time to give it a chance. Especially I’m a single mother and I’ve always told my children to go for their dreams. And I said, well, why am I not doing the same? So that’s how Dream Big Ventures was born. And you know, there’s a huge gap with equity and wealth and education on finances. You know, we don’t grow up talking about money. And so I’ve made it my mission to. Ensure that women are equipped with the tools because we make up half of the population and yet and so many facets, so many different industries, there is a huge gap. We’re not on boards, we’re not having equity, we’re not the CEO’s of Fortune 500 companies. I mean it’s just. Really ridiculous. So it’s time to make a change and takes people take action. And make bold moves if. We’re ever going to move the needle.

 

Hessie Jones

Exactly. And you just actually highlight something important because when I talk about people having specific expertise or or even I know something to say within a specific topic area, I think for both of you it’s important. This whole idea of equity, especially in the tech space and. And I think you both have loud critical voices when it comes to this lack of equity and how we can get it. So you know, I think we could talk about that a little bit later and how that actually moved the needle for both of you. But let me ask something really basic for both of you. First of all, what? Social platforms. Are you on Stephanie?

 

Stephanie Lipp

LinkedIn is my biggest one right now, and we have an Instagram that we’re going to be revamping this year.

 

Hessie Jones

And Staci?

 

Staci LaToison

I’m on LinkedIn, I’m on Instagram and I think the Instagram automatically updates on Facebook, but I’m also our podcast is on YouTube, Apple, Spotify. It’s on all the major platforms.

 

Hessie Jones

And do you two track the growth? Of your followers on your, on your respective channel steps.

 

Stephanie Lipp

Yes. Yeah, this year was it was one of the biggest jumps in, in followers and connections and and just a wide range of people. So it was really exciting to see all the different people that you know want to connect with me and the startup as well.

 

Hessie Jones

And Stephanie? Oh, sorry, Staci.

 

Staci LaToison

Yes, same here. It’s really important to track your analytics to know who is your community, who’s the audience that most resonates with you. So yeah, most of my community, it’s women between the ages of like 25 and 55. You know who are really thirsty for. For information. Who want to learn and continue to grow in their careers and in their personal journeys?

 

Hessie Jones

OK, so let’s, let’s, let’s start with you first, Stacy, because you’re, you’re doing this amazing job and in giving women the tools for this information, you’re a community builder. Your strategist, what was the moment that you actually thought that this is something that you wanted to do? Or was it? Was it something that just kind of happened? And leveraging your brand building, building it the way you have.

 

Staci LaToison

Yeah. So I have always, always been an advocate for equality. Since I was a little girl. I was always very independent and I think I had attended a conference during the pandemic and Serena Williams was a keynote speaker and that’s when I first learned that only 2% of VC funds go to women and underrepresented founders. So I mean, that was definite igniter for me to, you know, to do something about it, I figure. Well, I have thetoolso to do this. And more of us women need to, but also. I also attended a conference outside of my company, so I mean, you’re talking 22 years with a pension. I never even went to many career Expos externally because we do everything internally. And I saw that there was a Puerto Rican woman who was vice president at Pepsi. And it just like wow, really touched me because I had never seen that. And I still haven’t seen that to this day in oil and gas. Never ever was there a Latino woman who was at the. Top and in the C-Suite. And so, that made me realize there’s many others like me who are not seeing it. And so if you see me a lot on social media, it’s because I want to make sure that there is representation. So that others who are, you know, at these conferences and who are. You know, working in the corporations know that it is possible. You can do it too. So even though it might not look like it. Because you don’t. See that every day. But we are more than capable and anything is possible.

 

Hessie Jones

Thank you. So, Stephanie, I see you a lot also on LinkedIn and a lot of the stories that you tell like to me that there there’s a humbling effect that you have when you actually post the stuff that you do especially especially as. A biotech founder, you know? And in the clean tech space, where it’s incredibly hard. So did this come easy to you? Do it like I I understand that you you learn communications and you have been doing this before, but to actually leverage it for yourself. How how hard was that?

 

Stephanie Lipp

Yeah, it definitely wasn’t as easy to do it for myself. I always love to champion others, and I can always, you know, pick out the things that I want to share about other companies or people. But then I realize, oh, gosh, now I really have to do it for myself. And it wasn’t really until late 2021 when I won my first pitch competition, the 1st when I. Or did a couple weeks later I opened LinkedIn. There was so many connections and messages and people had shared things and I was like, oh, it just didn’t occur to me that anyone. Would you know care that much? It was. It was big for me, but I forgot how how much of A community there was out there and and I really realized that people actually like to support others. And so I wanted to. Be part of that. And it was just great that I could connect with a lot of different types of people from investors, ecosystem partners, other founders. That’s been a really great way to connect. And on the other side of that, as well as an early stage founder and startup, there’s a lot of value and pressure on making progress because that’s. A way to signal to investors and people that support you that you’re working hard, you’re making things happen and and so that was a great way to highlight. Like that? Yeah. It was a place to accumulate all my business activity and even just for myself to show that how far we’ve come. Sometimes it feels like we’re moving at a glacial pace, especially given the the conditions of the last year. But then I can look back. Or sometimes someone will like something for way back. I’m like, oh, yeah, we did that. And it just is. It’s a nice reminder that Rama was making progress and that there’s people out there who are cheering, so I always appreciate when Hussey. When you say, oh, I saw you do this and this because it reminds me that, yeah, there’s value in taking the time to to share the little wins and also, you know, talking about equality and representation. I never saw anyone that looked like me, you know, out there doing biotech, running company. And so if there’s someone else that happens along my my profile maybe. I look like them. They can resonate with me in some way and and. See that there’s all kinds of people that make a CEO. It’s not what we’ve just seen growing up. There’s like, yeah, so there’s possibility out there.

 

Hessie Jones

OK, now Staci has this become overtime. I think you guys both of you are starting to see a little bit of traction in in you actually just being out there and saying the things that you do and it is resonating with people. Are you starting or have you developed an actual strategy now to make this? Intentionally a channel that actually performs for you for your business, for your community.

 

Staci LaToison

Yes, I pretty much highlight what I’m going to post a little ahead of time, depending on what events are planned where I’m speaking, but it has helped to develop that thought leadership and as a result I’ve been reached, you know, reached out for speaking for judging pitch competitions. Co investments, you know, a little bit of everything. So, and mentorship.

 

Hessie Jones

But when you’re, so when you’re in, let’s say conferences and this goes to both of you. You know, everybody has to take a selfie or they have to. They take pictures and they say, oh, this is a great speaker, this is this is someone who’s doing something amazing, whatever. But sometimes it’s forced in a way because they have it’s almost like I’m at this conference. I hear some people that that that resonate with me is there. Can you balance out the need to actually post as opposed to, How do you know when? When it is a good post to post. You know what I mean? Let’s start with Stephanie. Do you understand my question?

 

Stephanie Lipp

Yeah. No, that’s a that’s a really good question because I mean especially my background photographer, the lesson I tend to do is ask anyone to take a photo of them or take a picture with me. It’s just, I don’t know, just weird. So I tried to. And I also like to have a variety of things. So I’ll take a picture, someone on stage or a poster, just to have a. Of of content. Because I think sometimes. Yeah, with the selfie it’s it’s great and interesting, but if you’re just have a whole carousel of these pictures, it it kind of almost becomes about you and it’s it’s about you know name dropping in a way that oh, I met this person, this person. But if you can actually you know take a variety of pictures kind of set the scene and and then that’s I guess it’s about bringing value to whoever is reading the post so that they can feel like they were there and they were. In it, rather than just seeing seeing you in a bunch of selfies because you know they’re hardly ever flattered. And then you don’t really get a sense of what the event was. So I think that’s why I kind of.

 

Hessie Jones

Thank you, Stacy. What about you?

 

Stephanie Lipp

Yes. Similarly, I’m very intentional with the messaging, you know, want to always empower and inspire. And for those who were unable to be there, maybe they couldn’t pay for that $500 ticket for that conference. They could feel like they were there and they could experience and get all the key takeaways. And bring that you know, back to them without having to, you know, pay that pricey ticket.

 

Hessie Jones

Well, so you also have a podcast I want to learn more about the podcast like. When did that start? And why and why did that start?

 

Staci LaToison

Yeah. So this is a groundbreaking podcast. I interview women across all industries who are CEO’s and influential business leaders. And, you know, oftentimes they are not the ones who are sought after for some of these major conferences. So I mean. That have all of this experience. They are like amazing outstanding powerhouses and. And so I just love being able to highlight them. There is no other podcast out there like this, for example. I interviewed a best selling. Author Liz Elting of Dream Big and Win, and I’ve seen her. Speak at a you know a different event, but they’ve really resonated with me since my company is called Dream Big Ventures. And I just. I asked her if she would be on the podcast and she said yes so, so, so exciting. And she sold her business for a billion dollars. So this show is all about providing tips and strategies. Or entrepreneurs for corporate professionals. For, you know, all women to be able to succeed in business and to learn more like it’s a safe space for because my guests are often they’re vulnerable and they tell like they’re they’re real, authentic stories because it’s not. Easy, getting to the top, you know, it is such a challenge, and a lot of times people only see the end. They don’t understand everything that you had to go through to get there and so on the show, they share all of the hard times and the hurdles. But also offer a lot of great advice and strategies so that others can succeed. So this show is about uplifting other women.

 

Hessie Jones

And it’s been resonating obviously with your audience.

 

Staci LaToison

Yes, yes. I mean, I’ve got VC’s who are GP’s that have raised $100 million funds to founders who are unicorns to, you know, women who started their own film and film studios. To you, I mean it across the board. A A woman who’s a Columbia law professor who is a huge advocate and investor in Women’s Health. So I mean, I. It’s just so exciting for me every single time I sit down with these women and interview them and, you know, learn about their stories. And I personally learn so much. And I know that the audience will, too. And they do.

 

Hessie Jones

So you said something that was really important. I want to turn this to Stephanie and you talked about authenticity and and so from Stephanie from your perspective, I mean this is this is almost like I would say the Holy Grail of social media, if you’re going to get people to connect with you in a way that. It’s not only profound, but from a relationship perspective, but also eventually, to help you build important connections. Tell me about how this has made a difference for you.

 

Stephanie Lipp

Oh yeah, this is. It’s been really, really great to build my presence online and yet again, as I mentioned bringing into in real life, you know, talking about clean tech and biotech and then you know, that really spilling over into the fashion side and being a female founder has brought me some really amazing opportunities to speak on panels. It’s a wide range of. Events you know on LinkedIn, you have time to make a draft and craft this message. But when you’re in a room with people and you know your your adrenaline’s going it, it’s a a really big challenge. So that’s something really been able to hone with these different experiences and it’s really brought me to the point of talking about the intersection of clean tech, our technology and solution in the fashion industry, which is exactly where my passion. Is and why? You know I’ve dedicated so much to to bringing this solution. Market. So it went from my first panel that was ever invited to was from the New York, Newfoundland Young Farmers Forum, which was in a small hotel in Gander, NL, talking to a room of, yeah, farmers who work really, really hard. So I was like, why, why am I selected to do this? You know, always with the a bit of imposter syndrome. But just last autumn, I was invited to speak at Elevate. Conference on the stage and then an event at Holt Renfrew for the H project anniversary. In the same week, so it just shows that I was just blown away that anyone want me to speak about farming in Newfoundland and then, you know, getting. These amazing panels in Toronto has been really cool to to see that progression.

 

Hessie Jones

So what do you think that is like when, when, when people see you like what? What do you think is the thing about Stephanie that wants people? What that that makes some of these organizations? Want to hear more or have or put you on stage to actually tell your story?

 

Stephanie Lipp

On the one hand, I hope it’s it’s positivity I by no means mean I believe in toxic positivity. I don’t sugarcoat things, but at the same time, I always remind myself it’s such an immense privilege to be able to pursue this. Fashion. Lots of people have to make choices with their lives and careers for survival. And so for me to be able to take this very untraveled path is is, is always a privilege. And so I always have to show gratitude along with any of the challenges. And I also try to be the type of person who always shows up, who’s prepared who, you know. Adds value and so that whenever someone puts my name out there, they can be confident that I’m going to perform and a little bit of a people pleaser, so I never want anyone to to, you know, not feel that I. I contributed to to whatever is going and they’re always for great reasons and purposes. And again, being someone up on the stage representing someone they haven’t seen before, I. Think that’s that’s. Always part of it. That’s really important and I do appreciate all the people giving me opportunities, not just because, you know, a founder of color because I’m a woman, but. I think it’s still. Acknowledge that there’s there’s a still a gap in the diversity of representation.

 

Hessie Jones

Yeah, I think that you know the one thing that I’m starting to realize is that there’s a lot of strength and vulnerability. And those who put themselves out there in ways that you know, it it it is hard, it’s hard to be able, as you say to, to tell the good, the bad and the ugly. But those are the things that resonate with people. So, Stacy, what about you, To be social. Naturally comes easier than doesfor for other people. For those people, for those founders just starting out right and who don’t come from the kind of background that both of you do, what do you say to them? Like, what? What kind of pieces of advice would you give them to? If they’re just.

 

Staci LaToison

Well, I think first of all, you don’t ever grow unless you step out of your comfort zone. So why not give it a try and you could do it your way. You know, even if you are more of an introvert, you don’t necessarily have to at least be in the forefront. You could put your product in the forefront. You could know what is some of those emoji and what do you call, you know, Jeff, that are funny, you know, and different. You know charts, I think female quotient does a lot of that where they don’t necessarily see, I don’t even know who the CEO is, but you always see them put different animations and different graphics. So yeah, you could do it your way and just be creative and to reach audiences. Also wanted to share that. One of the best compliments I’ve ever received was someone telling me Stacy, you’re a master in authenticity. You know. I am proud, you know, to to share that. No, my journey was not like the the spoon wasn’t silver spoon wasn’t, you know, handed to me. I was a teenage mother at 17. And you know, nobody would ever know that. But, I mean, I share it. Like and then I’ve had other women. It was like I the same thing happened to me. And they’ll come up afterwards and give me a hug. And like, just thank you for sharing that because looking at you and never would have never would have known. And then I I have one testimonial where she said, Oh my God, Stacy, I saw you speak in LA last year and, you know, I was so excited to see you and tell you and give you an update on what’s been going on in my life, she said. You know, based on what you said, I took action and I left that job, and now I’m making 50% more and I just bought my first home for my baby. I mean that is powerful. And so I feel like I am doing exactly what I’m. Supposed to be. Doing and living out my purpose in life to help others, and that’s something that when I was working my corporate job, I didn’t have that kind of reach. Yeah.

 

Hessie Jones

To keep going on that theme because Stephanie, can you tell me maybe some stories? Of people that you’ve met along the way where you’ve impacted them much like what Staci was talking about, how has your journey made an impact on on people as they start to progress?

 

Staci LaToison

Sure. Yeah, there’s this one really favorable moment in Elevate conference last autumn where this young woman came up to me, like, very gingerly. She’s like, hi, I was like, hi, how are you? And she’s like, are you Stephanie? I’m like, yes. She’s like, oh my gosh, I am so excited to meet you. I follow like that. I was just like, I could not believe this. This was just so she was so sweet and sincere. And I literally could not fathom it. Anyway, who I was out on like the Internet. And she was excited to see her purse, our prototype, talk to me. And that was like, a really good reminder that you really don’t know who’s out there. And if I. And, you know, make someone excited about material science and clean tech, and being, you know, a woman and running a company that was just really cool and sweet and so and. And yeah, people are constantly like, oh, I saw you on this and that and it’s. Yeah, it’s humbling and exciting that there is a wider world out there. Inside of my little bubble of clean tech and and the, you know, fundraising blows where it’s always positive, no one’s come up to me and said anything negative about what I do. They’re just happy to support. And I think that’s one of the nicest things about, yeah, the the community that I found and the people that follow is that they’re so incredibly supportive. You everyone can be united in trying to make the planet better and and preserve it for future generations. So I think there’s really powerful energy in that where, you know, there’s lots of great innovations. I think particularly in in clean tech. Yeah, everyone, it’s like really uniting and and positive.

 

Hessie Jones

I agree. I agree with that. I mean, I think with clean tech is because it’s one of the hardest sectors to actually evolve because it has to go through testing. It must go through validation that it’s not a SAS product you can put in the market within a year. It has to work right and. You know your purses. They have to be rock solid and you can’t have anything falling out of those purses, right? Especially if you’re developing an alternative material. So kudos to you for, for, for doing that. And I think the important thing for founders. Is that when you relay your stories, you know it’s important that you’re you’re telling, you’re telling, you know, the hard truth of being an entrepreneur. And I think for both of you, I think that that that’s very important. So for like Stacy, would you say there are challenges? With being with putting yourself out there. The way you do, whether or not it you know, is it is it a constraint on you? Is it a constraint on your your business? Is it is it? Is there weakness in being too authentic?

 

Staci LaToison

I don’t think there is. If anything, I think. It builds trust. With the community, because you’re being genuine and. No, I don’t think that. There’s, I haven’t seen any disadvantages yet, but are there? And what about? What about just?

 

Hessie Jones

With respect to time and effort. Because this is now integrated into your business, you have to do this every day. You have to continue to build a presence. It’s not like it’s probably equivalent to, let’s say, buying ads every day, but this time it’s really just about making sure that Stacy has to get out there specific time, every day or every other day. Etcetera. And so it it has to be baked into the stuff that you do, is that right?

 

Staci LaToison

Know what my biggest challenge? My biggest challenge is raising capital. And my other big challenge is, yeah, it’s time when when I talk about time, it’s more like because when you have meetings and then then the follow up. So but this part of it I I don’t think is. That challenging?

 

Hessie Jones

It’s the fun part, right? Yeah. So, how can you like, what? What kind of impact has this had? Do you think overall, let’s say now you say you you need to raise money, the connections that you’ve made to get to that specific goal, how has that impacted it?

 

Staci LaToison

Now there’s where I do see that there’s an advantage because of building. I mean, I have built a brand and a professional reputation for dream big ventures and for her money moves. And for Stacey Littleton, so. So yeah, people can go out and and they see what I’m doing. And oftentimes people in the community are like, Stacy, I see you’re killing it. We’re so proud of you. You know, what can I do to help and support you? And they want to partner with you. So you know, there’s been a lot of benefits from it.

 

Hessie Jones

So if I were to ask both of you if you were to Google your name today. Versus let’s say 10 years ago, what would? What would Google say about who is Stephanie versus who is Stacy? So I’ll start with Stephanie.

 

Stephanie Lipp

Sure. Yeah. I don’t think I had much of AA footprint 10 years ago or even three years ago. It was really in the last, yeah, 2-3 years that I started going out there actually told something. I’m like, I’m not. I’m not anonymous anymore. People can definitely Google me and they know exactly what I do, which is fine. I’m always proud about that. But yeah, there’s. I’ve had so many opportunities to speak and be interviewed. So I think it’s it’s cool that I have a footprint out there now, and no matter what happens, at least for this time in the Internet history, I could say that I was doing something and I was going for it and and and again, knowing that I do try to always, yeah, interject my values and and what is really important to me in terms of representation. Responsible consumption production to those things. So it’s it’s really consistent and I think that’s important in general to have that distance the online versus in person, you wouldn’t want me to talk a certain way in, in my post. And then you meet me and then I’m not really as pleasant that’s that’s not a nice surprise. You try to avoid surprise like that. So yeah, remembering what what people will read out there and then. Remembering to to carry that on into in my day-to-day actions and behavior.

 

Staci LaToison

Yeah, I don’t think I didn’t even create a LinkedIn account until maybe two years ago. So, yeah, 10 years ago I was in China, living my best life as an expat with Chevron and had no idea that I would be an entrepreneur one day, but definitely now when you look me up, I mean, you’ll see the podcast episodes. You’ll see me speaking at the rice women and Leadership Conference. You’ll see that I’ve won some awards. You’ll see the book. So you have made a lot of progress and a lot of momentum in the the last two years.

 

Hessie Jones

So if I were to ask both of you because it still feels like you both have a certain amount of advantage over a lot of startup founders. OK, so we have a startup founder who who’s building something, but they absolutely have like 0 social media presence. Maybe except for GitHub, let’s just say. All the developers know that person. What are some, let’s say no brainers to get them started? Like how? How do they start doing this on LinkedIn, especially among a community where they’re they’re trying to find out, get more customers or potentially find investment? Stephanie.

 

Stephanie Lipp

The two things I was thinking about are one that no one is too small, so don’t let your impostor syndrome in the way, which is easier said than done. But if. If you. Just participate in an event even if you didn’t win right about it. If you even read an article that’s a win for your your industry, that’s something to share. But to go along with that, which is the the key part is to reciprocate so. You know, liking, commenting and sharing in other peoples wins, however big or small, is really important because it means just as much to them as it does to you. When people do that for you and it just shows to everyone that you’re showing up for others, and I think that’s a really nice way to show that you’re committed because. It’s easy just to take all the likes and the shares, but to to to put it back out there in the world, I think will will really show on a human level and on a thought leadership level that you’re you’re in it for the right reasons and that you’re someone that other people want to amplify. And then those small wins will definitely turn into medium sized wins to bigger wins and huge. And then you’ll you’ll bring people along that journey with you. And I think at the beginning. Yeah, it really seems like, oh, just one, one thing people are gonna come. They just. I just one little pitch competition. But then, you know, in a couple of months it’ll be the second pitch competition. Then an article and and they’ll snowball that way. And as long as you’ve cultivated the the simple things like liking and commenting and sharing at the beginning you’re going to you know see that. Come back to.

 

Hessie Jones

You OK, Stacy?

 

Staci LaToison

Yes, I don’t know that I have much to add from Stephanie’s response.

 

Hessie Jones

But on the but on social media, so for let me see. I’m just trying to think, oh, maybe maybe the the question is where do you draw the line between between being someone who’s authentic, who’s sharing things and then being, let’s say, a spammer. Because some people can do it. Really some people can be really good at putting stuff out there all the time, but then for somebody that’s just starting out and they’re putting out. Content they they’re trying to get to the right audience and but they don’t want to be annoying. They don’t know the definition of authentic yet. Right? Because like I said, it comes easier to some people than others. How did they? How did they find that for social media post?

 

Stacie LaToison

Yeah, I think if you read a really great book, you know you could do a book review and share that. You could, you know, that’s relative to your industry and to what your to your company, you could, let’s say you attended a conference and maybe highlight some speakers. That really resonated with you and in your industry. Umm. Maybe you host kind of a webinar like what we’re doing. You know, it’s a good way to to highlight your product and and your business. That’s actually that’s a good thing in a way. I was just thinking about that because.

 

Hessie Jones

If you don’t. Know how to do social media as well. Then do something like a podcast where you’re the one asking questions and the experts are the ones giving their opinions, and so vicariously what you’re doing is you’re creating the content for those, for, for yourself, in a way, because you’re the one that needs a lot of those answers, right? So I mean it’s hard. And I completely get it and that these are the questions, the questions I’m asking you are the questions that many founders are asking me because they it’s it’s not easy for them and they don’t want to buy ads. They want to be relevant. They want to start connecting with the right audiences, but they don’t know how. So OK, so any closing thoughts for either of you, Staci, I’ll start with you.

 

Staci LaToison

Yeah, I mean, do your research, if there’s certain people that you follow and you really like what they’re doing, don’t be afraid to even reach out to them. And maybe that’s they can be your first interview. I am. And yeah, don’t feel like. Your you know, just don’t be afraid to put yourself out there and say, I mean, especially if you want your businesses to succeed, then it’s kind of part of the it’s part of it. You know, if you look. At a lot of very successful businesses, I mean. They have commercials, they have their name out there in the public. So especially if you’re going to be the CEO of this company and you’re representing it, then you’re going to have to learn how to get. Comfortable doing that, Stephanie?

 

Stephanie Lipp

I would say be as willing to take advice as you feel like you’re in a place to give it, and on the flip side, be as willing to give help as much as you’re willing to ask for it. Definitely be kind and show gratitude because that will show that will shine through anything that you do and. And I always ask how you’re bringing value, because I think that intent to bring other people value is how, again, you’ll get that returned many times over just by having it putting a good intent out there. Into the world.

 

Hessie Jones

Very nice. Thank you that that’s on that note. That’s all we have time for today and I thank you so much, Stephanie and and Staci for joining me. I know that I know I was grilling you, but I I’m thinking there must be an easy way for to be by who you two are. And I think there are a lot of people who continue to struggle. But I think the advice you gave today is great because now now founders who are just starting out will have at least some basic tools. And I would say be natural. Get out there and just try. Right. Nobody’s going to slam you for trying, and you’ll get better every day. That’s what I believe, anyway. So thank you both for coming for our audience. If you have topics, you want us to cover, please e-mail us at communications@altitudeaccelerator.ca and until next time, everyone please have fun and stay safe.

Host Information
Hessie Jones

Hessie Jones is an Author, Strategist, Investor and Data Privacy Practitioner, advocating for human-centred AI, education and the ethical distribution of AI in this era of transformation. 

She currently serves as the Innovations Manager at Altitude Accelerator. She provides the necessary support for Altitude Accelerator’s programs including Incubator and Investor Readiness. She will be the liaison among key stakeholders to provide operational support and ultimately drive founder success. 

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